Domace kobàsice {homemade sausages}

Domace kobàsice {homemade sausages}

Some of the best recipes are the ones that haven’t been overly tampered with. Less is more, as they say. When I visited Brisbane late last year to see the family I put in a request to my folks a couple of weeks before I landed. A request for some of my dads homemade sausages, or kobàsice as we call them.

Dad has been making them for as long as I remember and without sounding biased, they up there as being some of the most delicious sausages I’ve eaten and anyone that has tried them says the same thing.

Domace kobasice | heneedsfood.com

Not only did I want to try them, I wanted to watch him make them just as I remember from my teenage years when I lived up there. There’s no measured recipe as such, just a fairly consistent meat filling put together using sight, feel and taste. The syringe that he uses (metal casing part) was brought over from Croatia by my late grandfather back in the 70’s or 80’s and Dad carved the wooden plunger himself around the time he got it. This thing has helped feed many mouths!

Homemade Croatian sausages

It all starts in Dads shed, out the back next to his amazing vege garden. He’s already cleared and cleaned the work bench and starts preparing the pork intestine that is used as the sausage casing. The intestine comes salted and frozen and needs to be rinsed well and left in water before use.

The filling is made using pork mince and if it isn’t fatty enough you have to add more pork fat to keep the sausages moist, as we had to do by mincing up some fresh fat and mixing it into the meat with loads of fresh garlic (chopped & pounded with a little salt), mild paprika powder, black pepper, chilli powder and salt. It’s all mixed by hand and then tasted for seasoning.

Domace kobasice | heneedsfood.com

The intestine is then gently untwisted and Dad squeezes a jet of water inside of it to clear the way for the meat as well as remove any excess salt it was packed in. This also checks for any tears before gathering the intestine onto the syringe nozzle and filling the syringe with meat, packing it well so there are no air pockets. The rest is quite simple, really. The wooden plunger is inserted and pressed to force the meat into the intestine to create one very long sausage. If any air bubbles do develop, a trusty little spike will take care of that.

Once all of the meat filling is used the coil of sausage is simply twisted into portions and draped over a wooden pole. It can be eaten pretty-much straight away but in true family tradition they’re smoked for about a day to dry them out a little and give them that wonderful flavour. An absolute sensation on the char-grill!

Domace kobasice | heneedsfood.com

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