Achiote paste – pasta de achiote – recado rojo

Achiote paste – pasta de achiote – recado rojo

Achiote paste (recado rojo)

If there’s an ingredient that sums up many of the flavours that come out of the Yucatán, it has to be this.

Achiote paste.

It’s something I’ve been buying from my local Fiji Market for several years now, but now that they sell annatto seeds, the time came to make the paste myself.

Achiote paste (recado rojo

Annatto is the main ingredient in this vibrant spice paste, giving it the rich red-orange colour and earthy flavour.

Ever wondered where the colour of American cheddar comes from? This small seed from the achiote tree. Not that all cheddars use annatto, mind you.

To make my paste, I simply looked at the ingredients list on the one that I used to buy, looked at more online, and then made one myself. And you know what? It tastes just like the one from the packet, just with a little more punch.

Achiote paste (recado rojo)

So what do you do with it?

Well, it’s a perfect spice paste to use as a dry rub, dissolved and used in a marinade for meats and seafood or thrown into sauces and bean stews.

It’s pretty versatile, really.


 

Recipes where I’ve used the paste

Achiote paste (recado rojo)

 

Print Recipe
Achiote paste {pasta de achiote - recado rojo}
The flavours of the Yucatán in one versatile spice paste.
Achiote paste (recado rojo)
Course The Larder
Cuisine Mexican
Servings
cup
Ingredients
Course The Larder
Cuisine Mexican
Servings
cup
Ingredients
Achiote paste (recado rojo)
Instructions
  1. Place the annatto, peppercorns, cumin, coriander, garlic, cloves, pimento and oregano into a spice grinder. Grind until powdered.
  2. Transfer to a bowl. Mix in the salt and nutmeg, then add the vinegar and water. Combine well, press into a plastic container or jar and store in the fridge. Alternatively, freeze it and you can break off what you need when the time comes!
Share this Recipe
  • Barry Ozmo

    i’m keen to make a batch.

  • Sara (Belly Rumbles)

    Love Fiji Market. I had no idea about how American cheese got its colour, well there you go. Your paste looks gorgeous.

    • I understand American cheddar had colour added to it to set it apart from English Cheddar

      • I’ve read that it has to do with winter milk vs. summer milk, and a commercial desire to make winter-milk cheese more profitable (by fooling people into thinking it was produced with summer milk). What should be, in essence, the difference between a (less desireable) color that leans more toward white and (a more desireable) one that leans deeply into the “yellow” tint of cream led to an escalation that eventually produced a flat-out orange cheddar. This happened in Europe, as I understand it, but the Eurpoeans eventually (and wisely) backed away from the absurdity. Nonetheless, it became permanently stuck in the American mind that cheddar is orange.

  • This sounds so delicious! I’ve not found annatto in the spice shops near me yet, but I must get online and see if I can find it. I’d love to make this for myself. 🙂

  • Is it bad that now I picture a doona beneath every one of your incredibly styled photos? 😉

    • Lol. If you look carefully in some of my photos you’ll actually see the doona!

  • This seems really so easy. I have had some annatto seeds for quite a while now, having no idea what to do with them. And, if I switch out the garlic flakes and use shallot flakes, I will have one more really great condiment at my fingertips, right?

    • You sure will, David. I look forward to seeing some annatto inspired dishes on your site!

  • What a great idea John to make your own. I buy mine at Fiji market too but sometimes you can’t get it. you waded in deep there in the cheese section. Mimolette is one of the most well known French cheeses that is coloured by annatto too.

    • Yeah, I think what prompted me to make it was that the paste is sometimes out of stock!

  • Pingback: heneedsfood.com for food & travel()

  • Pingback: heneedsfood.com for food & travel()

  • Pingback: heneedsfood.com for food & travel()

  • Pingback: Corviche Manabita | my hot plate()

Real Time Analytics