Blood lime & finger lime curd

Blood lime & finger lime curd

Blood lime & finger lime curd recipe

I’ve had two punnets of blood limes staring at me for longer than I care to disclose; huddled between a packet of quandongs that have been there just as long, and box of blueberries in the bottom drawer of the freezer.

Alright then, it’s been a year. But they were still ok!

It was when my colleague turned up at work with a little gift that I thought I needed to do something with the sudden oversupply of little limes. I needed to address the situation.

Blood lime & finger lime curd recipe

Charred blood limes and finger limes

My previous experimentation with finger limes led to a delicious discovery. Charring the little suckers results in an almost jammy consistency – see my recipe for oysters with charred finger lime – so I thought I’d use this method again, deal with the glut of blood limes and create a charred lime curd.

Making curd is easy. I know there’s a microwave method wafting about the internet, but I believe some corners just shouldn’t be cut. Call me old fashioned!

Blood lime & finger lime curd recipe

 

Print Recipe
Blood lime & finger lime curd
Make this delicious blood lime & finger lime curd and tart up your breakfast toast!
Blood lime & finger lime curd, recipe | heneedsfood.com
Servings
cups
Ingredients
Servings
cups
Ingredients
Blood lime & finger lime curd, recipe | heneedsfood.com
Instructions
  1. Sterilise one 500 ml glass jar or two 250 ml jars by filling them with boiling water. Set aside the filled jars as you make the curd.
  2. Purée the pulp using a stick blender for 5-10 seconds. Put the pulp into a large heatproof bowl with the sugar and butter.
  3. Pour about 1 litre of water into a large saucepan, bring to the boil, then reduce to a simmer. Place the bowl containing the pulp over the saucepan, ensuring the water doesn't touch the bottom of the bowl. Stir with a wooden spoon until the sugar has dissolved.
  4. Very gradually pour in the beaten eggs, a little at a time, stirring constantly. Continue stirring for 15-20 minutes, or until the mixture thickens. Turn off the heat and carefully pour the curd into a heat resistant jug.
  5. Pour the water out of the glass jars and shake out excess. Pour the curd into the jars, screw on the lid and refrigerate immediately.
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  • Anita Brown

    Can I just use normal limes or lemons?

    • You sure can, Anita. Charring them won’t be so effective as they’re much bigger than the varieties I used.

      Also, the pulp sacs in finger and blood limes are much small, making them trickier to “juice”. That’s one of the reasons I charred them.

      This recipe is perfectly ok to use on regular lemons and limes should you choose to char, or not.

      • Anita Brown

        Awsum!!! Will try this for sure with normal limes. I haven’t seen the other ones up here at all. I’ll let you know how I go

  • Mila Furman

    John…you are KILLING me with your pictures!!! And I am so jealous of these cool looking foods you have in Aus! I don’t have finger blood limes 🙁

  • Okay first… I love ANY citrus curd, and make a lot of it here. Second, your recipe is so different that I need to try it. No pulp in mine, and I think that would make a huge difference in upping the tartness. Gorgeous, John, as always.

  • Ermahgerd this sounds amazing.SMOKE EVERYTHING!

  • I agree, when it comes to shortcuts, there is a line that shouldn’t be crossed. Don’t know who has a freezer large enough to keep limes for a whole year, but whatever. 🙂

    Love this. Did you save some for me? I’ll drop by work to pick some up? 🙂

    • You’re about a week too late, Nagi. I gave the last of my curd to my neighbour!

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  • AmandaChewTown

    I’m going to need to investigate this blood lime thing… and I love how you always think to smoke and char everything that I wouldn’t ever think of.

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