Dubrovnik rožata

Dubrovnik rožata

Unique to Dubrovnik and Croatia’s Dalmatian coastline, this baked custard dessert – or rožata – is not unlike crème caramel; something many people are probably more familiar with.

The difference along the Dalmatian Coast is that rożata has two additions that set it apart from the ones in Spain and France.

Dubrovnik rožata recipe

The first thing is the use of lemon zest, to infuse the milk as it heats during the custard-making process.

Secondly it’s the addition of ružolin – also known as rozalin or ružovača. This is basically a rose liqueur that can also be found around this part of Croatia, and I’ve got to say, it’s not the easiest stuff to source.

Well, not in Sydney, anyway.

dubrovik rožata

Research tells me it’s a liqueur that’s made in small batches, usually in people’s homes, and it’s available in specialty stores, markets or simply given away to friends and family as gifts. If I had the time, and a healthy supply of fresh rose petals, I would have done a batch of it at home. The only other ingredients you need is sugar and rakija – a distilled spirit that tastes much like firewater.

Many recipes for rožata use rum in place of ružolin. I used a mixture of rum and rosewater, as rožata does have a distinct rose flavour.

The end result? A delicate wobbly custard with just the right sweetness, the hint of lemon and aroma of rose.

And I love that it’s listed by Croatia’s Ministry of Culture, just like the hrapoćuša I made here.

Dubrovnik rožata recipe

 

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Dubrovnik rožata recipe
Unique to Dubrovnik and Croatia's Dalmatian coastline, this rožata is an elegant dessert that's sure to impress. Traditionally it uses ružolin, a liqueur made with rose petals, sugar and rakija. I've used a mixture of rum and rosewater to substitute.
Dubrovnik rožata recipe
Course Dessert
Cuisine Croatian
Servings
servings
Ingredients
Caramel
Custard
Course Dessert
Cuisine Croatian
Servings
servings
Ingredients
Caramel
Custard
Dubrovnik rožata recipe
Instructions
Caramel
  1. Put the sugar into a small pan over low heat. Let it dissolve, swirling the pan occasionally to help it along. Do not stir. Let it simmer until golden brown, then immediately - one by one - pour it into 4 ceramic or metal ramekins, swirling it up the sides before it sets hard. You need to work quickly here. Set them aside to cool.
Custard
  1. Preheat the oven to 150°C.
  2. Put the milk, sugar, vanilla seeds and pod into a small saucepan over low heat. Stir it occasionally to help dissolve the sugar, then turn off the heat before it begins to simmer. Set aside to cool to room temperature.
  3. Combine the beaten eggs, zest, rum and rosewater, then gently whisk this into the cooled milk, taking care not to froth up the mixture by whisking too hard.
  4. Pour the custard mixture through a fine mesh sieve, discarding the solids.
  5. Place each cooled ramekin into a deep ovenproof dish, then pour the custard mixture evenly into the prepared ramekins.
  6. Pour enough boiling water into the baking dish so that it comes ¾ up the sides of the ramekins.
  7. Bake for 40 minutes, or until the custard is almost set. Carefully remove from the oven, then take out each ramekin to cool completely. Refrigerate overnight.
  8. To serve, invert each ramekin onto plates.
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