Fettuccine with portobello, porcini & black truffle

Fettuccine with portobello, porcini & black truffle

Gubbio Italy

When I come across anything truffle related I can’t help but slip into extravagant mode and pretend I’m in a very different place. A moment in time that I’ll never forget. Somewhere far from Sydney and on the other side of the world.

If someone were to ask me “Do you prefer real truffles or chocolate truffles?” My answer would be uttered in a second.

Real truffles.

I’m talking about that glorious fungus that grows in the ground. A culinary diamond that’s either loved or something that people struggle to appreciate. There’s no struggle with me, however.

The most memorable truffle experience for me was in the Italian village of Gubbio, several months before I started this blog in 2009. Much of the time on that Italian jaunt was spent in Umbria/Perugia, up in the north of the country with my better half and his sister. Eating, drinking vino and exploring the local terra firma.

Gubbio Italy

Gubbio Italy | heneedsfood.com

Gubbio Italy

Gubbio Italy cobbled street

Gubbio Italy salami di cinghiale

Gubbio Italy ristorante

Gubbio Italy

A great way to get a birds-eye view of the old town is by taking a ride in the funivia. An open-air basket that carries you up Monte Ingino to Basilica Sant’ Ubaldo. Anyone with height issues may find it a struggle!

Gubbio is one of those typical preserved medieval hill-towns that’s all about Renaissance and Gothic buildings, steep cobbled streets and a food scene that’s saturated with game meats and local truffles. I remember picking up a clump of smoked chipolata-style sausages heavily studded with truffle; something I ate like grapes to savour that gloriously pungent and almost burning flavour. How could I not when truffles are so inexpensive in these parts?

I could have easily eaten my way around the numerous gourmet providores but we ended up lunching at a place called Ristorante Il Bargello. One of the most memorable meals I’ve had to date. As with most restaurants in Gubbio, their menu is truffle-centric and very affordable. €12 for tagliolini al tartufo? Yes please.

The pasta was nothing short of divine. Home made tagliolini cooked perfectly and lightly sauced-up with finely chopped porcini mushrooms and a healthy dose of black truffle.

* Truffle was supplied by Lilydale

Gubbio Italy funivia

Gubbio Italy

Gubbio Italy

Gubbio Italy Ristorante Il Bargello

Gubbio Italy Ristorante Il Bargello tartufo

I’ve recreated that dish from Gubbio with a black truffle that I recently acquired; a 22 gram beauty from Western Australia. To ramp up the mushroom content I’ve brought in some baby portobello – or baby bella – and of course used delicious dried porcini and the luscious liquid I soaked them in. For a caress of sweetness I’ve splashed in some marsala wine, just to keep the Italian theme running through this tasty dish.

One small truffle may not be enough to cover four servings, so finely grating it rather than shaving may be the way to go. Unless of course you get your hands on a larger specimen and get heavy-handed in the shaving action.

fettuccine with portobello, porcini & black truffle

fettuccine with portobello, porcini & black truffle recipe

fettuccine with portobello, porcini & black truffle recipe

 

Print Recipe
Fettuccine with portobello, porcini & black truffle
Reminiscing my travels through Umbria and recreating the dish that stole my heart.
fettuccine with portobello, porcini & black truffle recipe
Course Main Dish
Cuisine Italian
Servings
servings
Ingredients
Course Main Dish
Cuisine Italian
Servings
servings
Ingredients
fettuccine with portobello, porcini & black truffle recipe
Instructions
  1. Soak the dried porcini in the hot water for 1 hour. Remove the soaked mushrooms from the water and squeeze to drain well. Reserve the soaking liquor. Finely chop the drained porcini and set aside.
  2. Put on a large pot of salted water to boil.
  3. Heat the virgin olive oil in a large skillet over med-low heat, add the onion and sauté for 5 minutes until soft. Add the garlic, stir for 30 seconds and then add the butter. Increase the heat to medium and add the sliced portobello, gently stirring for 4-5 minutes.
  4. Add the chopped porcini, marsala and reserved porcini liquor. Bring to the boil and allow to simmer for a couple of minutes. Turn off heat and set aside.
  5. Once the pasta is cooked and drained, add it to the mushroom mixture along with half of the parsley and some finely grated Pecorino. Mix well and serve on individual plates or one large platter. Sprinkle over the remaining parsley, more grated Pecorino, a good drizzle of virgin olive oil. Finally, shave or finely grate the black truffle over the top.
Share this Recipe
  • Gorgeous, John. We loved Gubbio and had but one day there when staying near Cortona. It would be a place to which I could return for 2 weeks, especially if I could eat that pasta daily.

  • milkteaxx

    mushrooms, cheese,truffles and pasta. i am salivating.

  • so decadent and delicious

  • Helen (grabyourfork)

    Sho much shexy! Love the look of that hefty slices too.

  • Sara (Belly Rumbles)

    fungi over chocolate every time!

  • drooling right now. so much truffle goodness

  • AmandaChewTown

    I made pasta with my truffle too… how could you not?! Love it and the gorgeous imagery.

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