Fugazzeta rellena con jamón y queso

Fugazzeta rellena con jamón y queso

Pizza fugazzeta - Argentinian pizza stuffed with cheese and ham

Some prefer to have pizza fugazza – simply topped with onions and parmesan.

Others like a bit of mozzarella thrown on top – making it pizza fugazza con queso.

And then you can step into pizza fugazzeta territory, where the base is stuffed with mozzarella.

My preference is the more extreme fugazzeta rellena con jamón y queso – a base stuffed with ham and mozzarella. A little brie is snuck in there before it’s topped with more pizza dough, some onions, oregano and parmesan.

Pizza fugazzeta - Argentinian pizza stuffed with cheese and ham

So how is this Argentinian?

Well, the cuisine of Argentina is strongly influenced by Italy, thanks to a wave of immigrants flocking to this part of South America around the beginning of the 20th century.

Argentinian pizza has roots in Neapolitan cuisine, but I learned that fugazza comes from the northwest of Italy in the Ligurian region. I dug a little further and found that fügassa – cheese-stuffed focaccia – is specific to the coastal town of Recco.

All interesting stuff – to me anyway – but at the end of the day, fugazzeta is an Argentinian creation.

Pizza fugazzeta - Argentinian pizza stuffed with cheese and ham

Neapolitan pizza is my personal preference, so eating one that’s made using focaccia dough was a rather “bready” affair. This thing can get enormous!

It’s a bit of an onion-lovers paradise, thanks to a tangle of soft and crispy strands decorating the top. Many fugazzeta-makers use raw onion, others sweat it down a bit in a pan before using it.

Pizza fugazzeta - Argentinian pizza stuffed with cheese and ham

I’m not very good friends with raw onion, nor the breath it gives people, so a quick blanching in boiling water eliminates much of its sharpness, yet retains its flavour.

My favourite part of the fugazzeta I made is the soft mozzarella and brie at its core. The dominant flavour is all the oregano that’s put on there. Not too much, but enough to flavour the entire thing. I think chilli flakes are a must, plus a good toss of sea salt flakes that crunch as you bite into the pillowy pizza.

You could easily make one large rectangular slab of fugazzeta, or two smaller round ones, with the recipe I’ve provided. Alternatively the dough can be divided into three. Two thirds to make a fugazzeta and the other third for a simple fugazza.

Recipe adapted from here, and if you want it as cheesy as the ones in Argentina, top it with about three times more cheese. They’re mad for the stuff!

Pizza fugazzeta - Argentinian pizza stuffed with cheese and ham

 

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Fugazzeta rellena con jamón y queso
Pizza stuffed with ham and cheese then topped with caramelised onion. How about some Argentinian fugazzeta rellena con jamón y queso?
Argentinian pizza fugazzeta recipe
Course Main Dish
Cuisine Argentinean
Servings
servings
Ingredients
Dough
The rest
Course Main Dish
Cuisine Argentinean
Servings
servings
Ingredients
Dough
The rest
Argentinian pizza fugazzeta recipe
Instructions
Dough
  1. To make a starter, take 2 tablespoons of the flour and put it into a medium bowl. Add the sugar and yeast and mix to combine. Take 3 tablespoons of the water and mix to a slurry, using a fork. Cover with a kitchen towel and set aside for 20 minutes, or until doubled in size.
  2. Put the remaining flour into a large mixing bowl and mix through the salt. When the starter is foamy and doubled in size, mix it though the flour along with the oil, until a dough forms.
  3. Turn the dough onto your kitchen bench and knead it for 8-10 minutes, or until smooth and elastic. Lightly grease the large bowl you just took the dough from, drop in the kneaded dough to coat the bottom with the oil, turn over to grease the top, then cover with a kitchen towel. Set aside in a warm place and allow to rest and double in size (about 30 minutes).
  4. Start preparing the onions at this point.
  5. Cut the dough in two, then cut each half in two again - making one half slightly larger than the other. Put them back into the bowl as you do the remaining prep.
The rest
  1. Put about 600 or 700 ml water on to boil - no need to be precise. While that's happening, put your thinly sliced onions into a heatproof bowl. Pour the boiling water over the onions, press down and submerge any poking out, and allow to sit for 5 minutes.
  2. Drain the onions really well in a sieve, pressing them down to get as much water out as possible. Put the drained onions back into the bowl and mix in the 1 teaspoon dried oregano and salt. Set aside to cool completely before using.
  3. Grease two baking trays with olive oil or oil spray.
  4. Take each larger half of the dough and reform into a ball, leaving the smaller halves in the bowl. Using your hands, slightly flatten each larger half between both hands, then lay one in the centre of each greased baking tray, turning the dough over to grease the other side. Using your hands and fingers, press the dough into a circle that's 5 mm thick.
  5. Cover both of these with plastic wrap and allow to rest for 30 minutes.
  6. Meanwhile, do the same with the remaining smaller halves of dough, covering and allowing to rest, as well.
  7. Preheat oven to 250°C.
  8. Lay the sliced ham over the discs of dough that are on the trays. Scatter the grated mozzarella over the ham, leaving about an inch of the dough edge without cheese. Lay the slices of brie over the mozzarella, then sprinkle with the black pepper and a few oregano leaves.
  9. The two other discs of dough will be the tops of the fugazzeta. Carefully pick them up from the bench and lay them over the covered bases. If the top is larger than the bottom, simply cut it the same size with scissors. Press the edges gently to seal.
  10. Scatter the onions evenly over the tops of each fugazzeta, sprinkle over the grated parmesan and bake for 30 minutes - or until golden and the onions have slightly blackened.
  11. To serve, drizzle with virgin olive oil and garnish with fresh and dried oregano leaves, chilli flakes and sea salt.
Recipe Notes

The dough recipe makes 2 fugazzeta, or 4 fugazza

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  • John – I was showing your blog to a friend at work the other day and this was your post du jour. it looks fantastic, and not being a friend of raw onions either, I appreciated your tips there. This reminds me of one of your dishes I made – a stuffed pie like this filled with meat. I cannot remember the name but it was fantastic and I want to make it again. Do you know which one I am talking about?

    I also want to say thank you – for taking all the time you do to write of your and Dean’s adventures. It is a real gift and I truly hope you are enjoying writing it as much as we are reading it!

    • Not that it was filled with meat, but anchovies, onion and tomato – do you mean the Croatian komiška pogača?

      David, thank YOU for taking the time to even read the posts on our adventures. I love sharing it all, especially the photos. It’s also my way of documenting the things we’ve done, so that one day when we’re retired I can sit and look at what we did.

      • Yes – it was the Croatian komiška pogač! And I guess it just felt “meaty!” I bookmarked it now so I can’t forget again.

        You know, I always save your posts till I know I have time to enjoy the adventure. I don’t like reading them quickly… a waste of a good story!

  • Barry Ozmo

    i’m picturing you with a fat little tummy after that one.when you get through this trip we would all like to know how many kilos you added or remarkedly that you walked it all off;-)

    • Well let me tell you, after being on the road for 5 months now, I struggle to hold my tummy in!

  • This sounds (almost) too tasty to be true! I need to make this and try it!

  • I was clearly showing how bad my Spanish is, Alberto. Thanks for letting me know!

  • Hi Carlos, Well then it sounds like you and me have very similar tastes. I hope you try it sometime!

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