Home-made duck prosciutto

Home-made duck prosciutto

Home made duck prosciutto recipe

The first meal we had when landing in Boston last year was at a fab little Spanish joint in the South End. A great place to kick back with some good vino and as many tapas as your heart desires. The first dish we enjoyed couldn’t have been simpler. Jamón de pato – or jamón of duck. House-cured duck breast, thinly shaved and sprinkled with espelette pepper and orange zest. I took a mental note and vowed to give duck breast curing a go when we got home.

It took a few months, but I eventually came around to it. And it couldn’t be easier.

The process at home is a little different to traditional or commercial methods. It’s as simple as salting the duck breast then cocooning it in herbs and muslin. Laid to rest in the fridge for some time and then it’s done. I’m sure there’s a certain fridge temperature that’s ideal, or a cool basement if I had one, but the cheese compartment in my fridge door sufficed. It’s the warmest spot in my fridge and it worked.

The outcome after sitting in the fridge for three weeks? A delicious, soft-yet-firm cured duck breast that’s like any regular jamón or prosciutto.


Recipes where I’ve used duck prosciutto –

Home made duck prosciutto recipe

Home made duck prosciutto recipe

Home made duck prosciutto recipe

Home made duck prosciutto recipe

 

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Home-made duck prosciutto
Home made duck prosciutto recipe
Course The Larder
Servings
breasts
Ingredients
Course The Larder
Servings
breasts
Ingredients
Home made duck prosciutto recipe
Instructions
  1. Using a sharp knife, score the skin of the duck breast in a cross pattern. Combine the salt, dried oregano and pepper. Pile ¼ cup of the salt mix on a square of plastic wrap, repeating a second time for the other breast. Flatten slightly so the salt is the same size as the breast. Lay the duck breasts on each pile of salt and pour the remaining salt over each breast.
  2. Carefully wrap each parcel tightly, making sure the salt encases the breast completely. Place the parcels onto a small plate and refrigerate for 24 hours. Turn the parcels over and refrigerate for another 24 hours. You'll notice after the two days that a lot of the moisture has seeped from each breast and made the salt soppy.
  3. Unwrap each breast and discard the salt. Wipe any remaining salt off the duck breasts. Lay each breast on muslin, skin side down, and pile the fresh thyme and sage on top. Wrap the breast and herbs tightly in the muslin so there are 3-4 layers of the muslin around the breasts. Tightly truss with kitchen string and store in the cheese compartment in your fridge, or somewhere that has a closing lid. Lay the bamboo sushi mat beneath the breasts for air circulation.
  4. Curing time will vary due to the size of the breasts. After two days of salting, mine cured in the muslin for exactly three weeks. The size of the breast reduces as it dries and cures, and after three weeks it should be firm to the touch yet still a little soft. You can always unwrap a breast and slice it to check.
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