Kangaroo Prosciutto

Kangaroo Prosciutto

Kangaroo prosciutto recipe

So I’d previously tried my hand at duck prosciutto, discovering how simple it really can be. It wasn’t the only thing that ended up being bound in muslin for three weeks. Something else that made it into the fridge was a couple of kangaroo fillets; all cocooned and enhanced with native Australian herbs and spices.

The procedure is the same as the duck breasts I made – a salting and then some time to sit and slowly dry out in muslin. The only noticeable difference is that kangaroo doesn’t have the fat that duck does. Fat helps in the process; flavour-wise and texture-wise. The result is still a soft and pliable meat, only a little drier and without the marbling.

Other recipes using kangaroo prosciutto –

Pici with kangaroo prosciutto & shimeji mushrooms

Kangaroo prosciutto recipe

 

 

 

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Kangaroo Prosciutto
Trying my hand at salt-curing one of our native animals - the kangaroo.
Kangaroo prosciutto recipe
Servings
grams
Ingredients
Kangaroo prosciutto
Kangaroo prosciutto salad with quail eggs, horopito pepper & merlot salt
Servings
grams
Ingredients
Kangaroo prosciutto
Kangaroo prosciutto salad with quail eggs, horopito pepper & merlot salt
Kangaroo prosciutto recipe
Instructions
Kangaroo prosciutto
  1. Combine the salt and mountain pepper.
  2. Pile ¼ cup of the salt mix on a square of plastic wrap, repeating a second time for the other kangaroo fillet. Flatten slightly so the salt is the same size as the fillet. Lay the fillets on each pile of salt and pour the remaining salt over each fillet.
  3. Carefully wrap each parcel tightly, making sure the salt encases the kangaroo completely. Place the parcels onto a small plate and refrigerate for 24 hours. Turn the parcels over and refrigerate for another 24 hours. You'll notice after the two days that a lot of the moisture has seeped from each kangaroo fillet and made the salt soppy.
  4. Unwrap each fillet and discard the salt. Wipe any remaining salt off. Combine the pepperberries and bush tomato and roll the kangaroo fillets in the mix. Wrap the fillets tightly in the muslin so there are 3-4 layers of around them. Tightly truss with kitchen string and store in the cheese compartment in your fridge, or somewhere that has a closing lid. Lay the bamboo sushi mat beneath the fillets for air circulation.
  5. Curing time will vary due to the size of the fillets. After two days of salting, mine cured in the muslin for exactly three weeks. The size of the fillet reduces as it dries and cures, and after three weeks it should be firm to the touch yet still a little soft. You can always unwrap a fillet and slice it to check.
Kangaroo prosciutto salad with quail eggs, horopito pepper & merlot salt
  1. Bring a small pot of water to the boil. Carefully drop in the quail eggs and allow to cook for 2-3 minutes. Drain and cool th eggs under running water. Peel and cut in half.
    Quail eggs food styling
  2. Assemble the prosciutto, radish, leaves and quail eggs on a platter or serving plates any way you wish. Drizzle with olive oil and scatter with the seasoning.
    Kangaroo prosciutto with quail eggs & horopito pepper recipe
Recipe Notes

Adding  the prosciutto to a charcuterie board is a great way to enjoy it, but I've done a dainty little salad that makes it the star of the plate. No precise proportions are needed so go with how you're feeling, should you choose to make this.

I've used some tasty merlot salt that I found in New York and New Zealand's native herb - horopito pepper. Go with regular sea salt flakes and black pepper if you can't get it.

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  • Geoff

    I have dried kangaroo it is beautiful and reminds me exactly of dried horse meat which is a common dried meat in some European countries

  • Geoff

    Although this website claims to retain the meat in salt for 2 days, this is not correct, the meat will dry out to quickly and will simply be too salty, maximum not more than 24hours.

    • Thanks for your feedback, Geoff, and the spicing method that you prefer to use. Due to the size and thickness of the kangaroo that I used, the 2-day salting method I used was correct to its size. I tested a piece after one day and it was still quite raw in the middle. Not cured enough. As all cuts will vary in size or thickness, so too will the curing time.

  • Geoff

    After 24 hours in salt, you must rinse it well under cold water to ensure you have removed all salt, then dry the meat with some paper towel, take some cumin spice, mix with a little water and make a paste, rub the paste over the kangaroo meat so you have a good covering over the meat, then take some dry spices, some mixed dry herbs are good, as we live in Australia we then hang inside fridge for minimum of 10 days, you could then slice thin and try, we then wrap in news paper and simply leave in a closed container for use when you want, it lasts well but never long enough before you make the next one! enjoy!

  • Geoff

    Hi John, yes I the thickness does have some bearing on salt penetration and the particular cut of Kangaroo, I was using a standard piece of Kangaroo fillet about 200gms approximately 25mm in thickness, this is normally the size of kangaroo fillet we would use. Certainly in our experience when curing Pork meat, beef and I have tried Lamb, the thickness is about 50mm and still 200 gramms and this from our experience has no bearing on the length of the time, you still only retain the fillet in salt for 24hours, as although you have rinsed all the salt off and yes it will still be raw inside the salt has already started fermentation of the meat and this will then simply take a little longer than normal to finally cure. Certainly you can start to slice thinly at the ends of the fillet and move down as the curing time extends, of course we are traditionally using pre-selected sizes of meat.
    One very important point when curing, ensure the container you have the fillet in is placed on an angle in the fridge so the liguid (blood) drains itself away from the meat!
    Of course everyone’s personal taste is whats important,
    We have just started to make Bulgarian Lukanka (dried sausage) we have about 40 days before we can taste, will be interesting!
    You have me thinking about kangaroo dried meat again so this is I will do again very soon.

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