Panamanian ceviche with finger lime

Panamanian ceviche with finger lime

Panamanian ceviche preparation with Global Knives sai series 19 cm santoku knife sai-03

One thing I noticed as we travelled around Panamá was the abundance of fresh seafood. There’s a hodgepodge of influences there – Spanish, African and Native American (amongst others) – forming a cuisine that isn’t dissimilar to its neighbours. Aside from many edibles that have something to do with corn, plantain, rice and beans, seafood pops up quite a bit.

The word Panamá does mean “abundance of fish”, after all, so it’s a given that it plays a big part in the country’s cuisine.

Panamanian ceviche recipe

Head to Mercado del Mariscos, Panamá City’s fish market, and you immediately get a sense of a city’s love for all things seafood. Inside it’s your typically frantic, noisy and slightly smelly fish market.

Outside it’s flanked by a row of ceviche stands vying for your business. Corvina (similar to sea bass) is the most popular, but shrimp, squid, octopus and black clams are also up for grabs – pre-made and simply scooped into a cup and served with a packet of salted crackers.

And it’s so cheap!

Panamanian ceviche recipe

I thought I’d share a recipe for ceviche – a tasty dish that’s incredibly easy to construct. We don’t get corvina in our neck of the woods, but alternatives are still plenty. Cod, snapper, tuna and mackerel can all be used; or deep sea bream, which was my choice.

You’ll also notice the curing time is much longer in this ceviche than the Perúvian variety, and the fish is cut differently.

The limes used in Panamá are different to the ones we commonly see at home in Australia. They’re not as sharp and have a very slight sweetness to them. This translates through to the ceviche, so with my use of ‘regular lime’, I added a small amount of sugar to the mix. Not enough to sweeten the juice, but more to take the edge off it.

A bit of lettuce is occasionally served with Panamánian ceviche – something you don’t often see with Panamánian food. I’ve gone a little further and tricked it up with some of my home-grown finger limes. The pops of sharpness are perfect here.

I also couldn’t help myself with a few foraged bits and pieces like society garlic flowers, lemon verbena flowers and leaves, purslane and fennel fronds.

Whether you serve it simply in a cup or fancily arranged on a plate, this is one dish that enlivens the palate.

Panamanian ceviche recipe

 

Print Recipe
Panamanian ceviche with finger lime
There are many types of ceviche to try, so why not give Panamanian ceviche a try? I've topped mine with Australian native finger lime.
Panamanian ceviche recipe
Course Starters
Cuisine Panamanian
Servings
people
Ingredients
Course Starters
Cuisine Panamanian
Servings
people
Ingredients
Panamanian ceviche recipe
Instructions
  1. Get your diced fish, red onion, chillies, lime juice, salt and sugar into a ceramic or glass bowl. Give it a good stir to dissolve the salt and sugar, cover with plastic and refrigerate for at least 4 hours, or overnight.
  2. To serve, scoop the ceviche into small bowls or onto a plate, scatter over the finger lime pulp, black pepper, herbs and flowers. Serve with crackers.
Share this Recipe
  • I love ceviche and just wish I could get hold of a finger lime so could recreate yours exactly, of course, I can’t get sea bream, either… And, one thing learned – the translation of Panamá! Thanks for that!

    • Yes I definitely learned a lot about pronunciation as we travelled through Latin America. The locals don’t hold back in correcting you!

  • KevinIsCooking

    I’m always up for a new twist to ceviche and this one looks wonderful. I can never find finger limes and I live in an area that have many a Mexican produce market (San Diego is right near the Mexican border). I’m sitting here wanting your ceviche and wish I could grab one through the screen and it’s only 9am here!

    • I guess nobody is importing finger limes from Australia or growing them there yet. They really do add a nice touch to the ceviche.

  • I’ve never tried ceviche — just because I’ve never had the opportunity. We’ve run across corvina several times at the Costco in Sarasota — an amazing fish. I could never get tired of it. Can’t believe how mild it is. Your capture of the ceviche is beautiful. Anyone who says you have to have fancy equipment and props to make a dish look beautiful is nuts — just look at what you’ve created. I’m sharing your recipe. Thank you.

    • Thanks, Marisa. Well now that you know where to get corvina, you can try ceviche! I hope you do!

Real Time Analytics