Presnac

Presnac

Presnac recept od Krk

This is a dessert recipe from the rocky island of Krk, located at the top of the Adriatic near the Istrian peninsula. To my understanding, almost every village on the island uses the same preparation for this rustic little cake, although I’m sure there are variations all over the Balkans.

Presnac recept od Krk

Presnac recept od Krk

What makes it unique to Krk is the cheese that goes into it; a local cheese produced from sheep or goats that graze on the island. Due to the sodium-rich rocky pastures, the milk from these animals has its own unique taste, producing a cheese that’s an island delicacy.

Thanks to being on the opposite side of the world to Croatia, finding krčki sir in Sydney is pretty much impossible. The flavour/texture profile seems to lean towards a cross between feta and manchego. Not salty like feta, but with a similar “squeakiness”, and the same creamy density as manchego.

My choice was a manchego that had as little salt as I could find. There was a lot of tasting going on in the deli’s I went to, believe me! The pastry is much like your regular pie variety, harbouring a filling that’s akin to that of a friand.

Here’s hoping I get to Krk when I’m next in Croatia, just to try the cheese and hopefully find somewhere that makes presnac. Only then will I see how this one compares to the one that’s made where it originates.

All in good time!

Presnac recept od Krk

 

Print Recipe
Presnac
Unique to Croatia's island of Krk, presnac is a sweet and savoury cake like no other.
Presnac recept od Krk
Course Dessert
Cuisine Croatian
Servings
cakes
Ingredients
Dough
Filling
Course Dessert
Cuisine Croatian
Servings
cakes
Ingredients
Dough
Filling
Presnac recept od Krk
Instructions
Dough
  1. Combine flour and sugar and then rub the butter into it. Mix in the eggs and gradually add the milk if the mixture is still dry. You want a soft dough that isn't sticky.
  2. Knead the dough for 5 minutes, divide into 2, cover and set aside.
Filling
  1. Combine all ingredients and mix well. Set aside.
  2. Grease two shallow 15cm ovenproof bowls with butter.
  3. Preheat the oven to 170°C.
  4. Roll each half of dough into a 5mm circle. Lay the pastry on the bowl, allowing the edges to drape over. Take half of the filling and roll it into a ball with your hands. Lay this onto the rolled pastry, bringing up the overhanging pastry and pinching it every 5 centimetres.
  5. Bake in the oven for 50 minutes, to until golden. Sprinkle with sugar before serving.
Share this Recipe
  • Liz Posmyk

    Wow, a beautiful post, John… fascinated by the use of sheep’s cheese in this dessert. x

  • What a cool cake this is! And how cool is it that there is a town in Croatia with no vowels! I want to go to Krk just to say I did… and, of course, try the cheese and cake.

    I want to come to Sydney to take photography lessons with you. Oh, and eat everything you cook!

    • You’re welcome anytime, David. We have a spare bedroom that rarely gets used!

      • It will happen someday, John! I really look forward to it!

  • How beautiful! I can’t wait to try it!

  • Wow! What an interesting little cake. Like a freeform pie with a filling that rises. Thanks for sharing!

  • Such a pretty little tart. And I’m smiling at the thought of you nibbling on manchego cheeses all over Sydney!

  • Sara (Belly Rumbles)

    Such a stunning tart and worthy of all the cheese research you put in.

  • Wow John. So is the sheep cheese a semi hard cheese a little like the manchego?. What a perfect and stunning looking tart. So amazingly simple in the ingredients section. I love this kind of sugar/ cheese combo. I also love how it throws people. they can’t get a handle on cheese and sugar.

    • Yes the cheese I used here was semi-hard manchego, Tania, although I look forward to trying the sheep cheese that’s traditionally used on the island for this tart. That’s if I find it when I eventually get there!

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