Quince galettes with lemon thyme

Quince galettes with lemon thyme

Quince galette with lemon thyme recipe

There they were, peering at me from a box at the grocer; bright yellow, nobbly and unloved. All the boxes of fruit surrounding them were getting attention, yet the poor quinces sat untouched.

Maybe it’s because people don’t really know what to do with them? Or perhaps its because they require a little preparation before they can be eaten?

Quince galette with lemon thyme recipe

Quince galette with lemon thyme recipe

Have you ever tasted raw quince? It’s not fun. Kind of like eating a raw potato, but worse.

I couldn’t ignore these poor little dears, so I grabbed a handful and took them home. I wanted a treat; a little bit of warmth as the colder temperatures sweep into town and leaves rain down from the trees.

Quince galette with lemon thyme recipe

A bit of baking is one sure-fire way to warm up the kitchen. The smell of golden quince steaming in a bath of sugar and cinnamon, soon to be wrapped in a blanket of pastry scented with lemon thyme.

Yep, I’m feeling warm now.

Quince galette with lemon thyme recipe

 

Print Recipe
Quince galettes with lemon thyme
Fill your house with the sweet smell of baking quince galettes and lemon thyme.
Quince galette recipe
Course Dessert
Servings
servings
Ingredients
Course Dessert
Servings
servings
Ingredients
Quince galette recipe
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 120°C. Line a medium baking dish with baking paper. Set aside.
  2. Peel and cut the quince into quarters. Cut the cores out, then cut each quarter into 4, lengthways. Place the cut quince into a mixing bowl and toss well with the sugar and cinnamon. Lay the quince in the baking dish in a single layer and scatter all of the sugar and cinnamon over the top evenly. Cover the dish with foil and bake in the oven for 1 hour, or until soft. Remove the cinnamon and discard it. Set aside the quince to cool. You can do this ahead of time.
  3. Alternatively, place the sliced quince into a pot with 500 ml water, the sugar and cinnamon stick. Bring to the boil, reduce heat and allow to simmer, covered, for 45-50 minutes. Scoop out the cooked quince, discard the cinnamon and keep the sugar syrup, if you wish. You can reduce it further to drizzle over the galettes, or over ice cream.
  4. To make the pastry, place the flour, caster sugar and salt into the bowl of a food processor. Pulse a couple of times to mix together. Add the butter and pulse until there are still small pieces of butter through the flour mixture.
  5. Gradually add the iced water, pulsing as you go. You may not need to use all the water. Stop adding water when the dough just comes together.
  6. Bring the dough together, flatten into a 1-inch thick disc, wrap in plastic and refrigerate for 30 minutes.
  7. Preheat the oven to 190°C. Line a baking tray with baking paper.
  8. Lightly flour your work surface. Remove the dough from the fridge and evenly cut it into 6. Take one piece of dough and roll into a ball, then using a pastry roller, flatten into a disc about 16 cm in diameter. Lay the cooled quince in a single layer in the centre of the pastry disc, leaving 2½ cm on the edges.
  9. Sprinkle over some of the thyme leaves. Gently bring the edges towards the centre, folding over on top of the quince, leaving the centre uncovered. Gently press down and place onto the lined baking tray. Repeat this process with the remaining dough.
  10. Brush the top of the galettes with the beaten egg, sprinkle over about 1 teaspoon of sugar per galette, and a few more thyme leaves, if you wish.
  11. Bake for 20-25 minutes until golden.
  12. Can be eaten hot or at room temperature.
Share this Recipe
  • I love quinces, really love them! There is no better way to eat them than wrapped in a blanket of pastry 🙂

  • jean

    ooh.. I could do with one of those now.. I’ve printed off your great recipe.. thanks J.. my Francois loves Quince Jelly.. clear, with that delicate perfume .. just amazing with roast pork or even pork sausages! I’m off to find those quinces..

  • AmandaChewTown

    I am very partial to quince. I agree that the reason they are often overlooked is because people don’t know what to do with them. Well, what a perfect way to use them. I can just imagine the wonderful flavour of these divine galettes as you bit into them.

  • Love how your pics scream autumn. What I would do to sink my teeth onto one of those galettes – the pastry looks so good!

  • I love the lighting in your 3rd pic and have no idea how you did it with what I think is natural light. And the 4th pic floored me and made me want to make this NOW. As for quince, I don’t think I’ve ever bought it. Having said that, I just got home from my mum’s where I stole a bunch of her herbs – including lemon thyme – and I have quince paste and frozen pastry (yes, go ahead, judge me!). So I am tempted to give this a go – in a round about way!! 😉

    • No judgement here, Nagi! Sounds like a great collection of ingredients where anything can happen. And regarding light, it’s only ever natural light with my recipes. Pics 1, 2, 4, 5 & 8 were all taken outside in overcast conditions, the others inside near either the front door or bedroom window!

  • Looking at Nagi’s question and your answer, it would be fun to see all the places where our photos are taken. These shots are gorgeous, John, but I was thrilled to see your baked quince as the filling. I have only cooked with it once, and it was just okay. This would make a big difference. They are hard to find here – usually in the fall fro 2 weeks. I will be trying this, for sure.

  • Sarah Kenney

    They look as adorable as they do delicious. We don’t have quince in the south. I don’t know if there are quince up here in the northeast. I’ll have to pay attention. I’ve only had it in France as a jam. I’ll show them some love if I see any!

    • I hope you come across some quince someday, Sarah. Would love to see what you’d do with them!

  • Sara (Belly Rumbles)

    I did purchase some quinces. Then I went away before I had the chance to use them. They died a very sad and unloved death in my fridge. Such a waste as I am salivating a little over this recipe right now.

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