Quince galettes with lemon thyme

Quince galettes with lemon thyme

Quince galette with lemon thyme recipe

There they were, peering at me from a box at the grocer; bright yellow, nobbly and unloved. All the boxes of fruit surrounding them were getting attention, yet the poor quinces sat untouched.

Maybe it’s because people don’t really know what to do with them? Or perhaps its because they require a little preparation before they can be eaten?

Quince galette with lemon thyme recipe

Quince galette with lemon thyme recipe

Have you ever tasted raw quince? It’s not fun. Kind of like eating a raw potato, but worse.

I couldn’t ignore these poor little dears, so I grabbed a handful and took them home. I wanted a treat; a little bit of warmth as the colder temperatures sweep into town and leaves rain down from the trees.

Quince galette with lemon thyme recipe

A bit of baking is one sure-fire way to warm up the kitchen. The smell of golden quince steaming in a bath of sugar and cinnamon, soon to be wrapped in a blanket of pastry scented with lemon thyme.

Yep, I’m feeling warm now.

Quince galette with lemon thyme recipe

 

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Quince galettes with lemon thyme
Fill your house with the sweet smell of baking quince galettes and lemon thyme.
Quince galette recipe
Course Dessert
Servings
servings
Ingredients
Course Dessert
Servings
servings
Ingredients
Quince galette recipe
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 120°C. Line a medium baking dish with baking paper. Set aside.
  2. Peel and cut the quince into quarters. Cut the cores out, then cut each quarter into 4, lengthways. Place the cut quince into a mixing bowl and toss well with the sugar and cinnamon. Lay the quince in the baking dish in a single layer and scatter all of the sugar and cinnamon over the top evenly. Cover the dish with foil and bake in the oven for 1 hour, or until soft. Remove the cinnamon and discard it. Set aside the quince to cool. You can do this ahead of time.
  3. Alternatively, place the sliced quince into a pot with 500 ml water, the sugar and cinnamon stick. Bring to the boil, reduce heat and allow to simmer, covered, for 45-50 minutes. Scoop out the cooked quince, discard the cinnamon and keep the sugar syrup, if you wish. You can reduce it further to drizzle over the galettes, or over ice cream.
  4. To make the pastry, place the flour, caster sugar and salt into the bowl of a food processor. Pulse a couple of times to mix together. Add the butter and pulse until there are still small pieces of butter through the flour mixture.
  5. Gradually add the iced water, pulsing as you go. You may not need to use all the water. Stop adding water when the dough just comes together.
  6. Bring the dough together, flatten into a 1-inch thick disc, wrap in plastic and refrigerate for 30 minutes.
  7. Preheat the oven to 190°C. Line a baking tray with baking paper.
  8. Lightly flour your work surface. Remove the dough from the fridge and evenly cut it into 6. Take one piece of dough and roll into a ball, then using a pastry roller, flatten into a disc about 16 cm in diameter. Lay the cooled quince in a single layer in the centre of the pastry disc, leaving 2½ cm on the edges.
  9. Sprinkle over some of the thyme leaves. Gently bring the edges towards the centre, folding over on top of the quince, leaving the centre uncovered. Gently press down and place onto the lined baking tray. Repeat this process with the remaining dough.
  10. Brush the top of the galettes with the beaten egg, sprinkle over about 1 teaspoon of sugar per galette, and a few more thyme leaves, if you wish.
  11. Bake for 20-25 minutes until golden.
  12. Can be eaten hot or at room temperature.
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