Romanesco & soya bean bruschetta

Romanesco & soya bean bruschetta

Romanesco cauliflower recipe

Here we are revisiting a vegetable that I consider to be one of the most beautiful around. My previous encounter with it involved a bit of spicy heat, some crunch from fried capers and almonds, with pops of colour from pomegranate and native Australian riberries.

What I’ve created here is another play on colours, textures and flavours. There’s nothing like mixing things up, right?

I’ve kept things on vegetarian side with this one, although some crumbled crispy prosciutto would take it to another level.

Romanesco cauliflower recipe

My freezer has a bag of soya beans in it pretty much year-round. Handy to have, really, tossed into stews and curries, quickly pan-fried with some bacon; they’re quite the resourceful ingredient. All I’ve done is make a simple purée with the soya beans; nothing too glamorous as I didn’t want it to compete with the other layers.

That stash of beet & blueberry chutney I made recently came in use with many things I knocked together in the kitchen – namely with meaty concoctions, mind you.

I’ve topped the purée with the chutney, then crowned it with wedges of the gorgeous Romanesco that I’ve briefly steamed and pan-seared with spices. There’s crunch, there’s salt, there’s sweet and there’s sour. A great little canapé idea, as well!

Romanesco cauliflower recipe

Romanesco cauliflower recipe

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Romanesco & soya bean bruschetta with beet & blueberry chutney
These romanesco & soya bean briskets are the perfect for brunch, lunch or made in miniature as a canapé!
Romanesco cauliflower recipe
Servings
servings
Ingredients
Servings
servings
Ingredients
Romanesco cauliflower recipe
Instructions
  1. Bring a small pot of water to the boil. Carefully toss in the soya beans and boil for 8 minutes. Drain and set aside to cool for 10 minutes. Place the warm soya beans, water and ground coriander into a jug or small bowl. Using a stick blender, blitz them into a smooth paste. Check for seasoning and set aside.
  2. Steam the wedges of romanesco for 8 minutes. Set aside to cool.
  3. Place a small skillet over medium-low heat. Toast the cumin and mustard seeds until golden and aromatic. Do not burn! Put the spices and pinch of salt into a mortar, and pound to a powder using the pestle. Alternatively use a spice grinder.
  4. Place a large skillet over medium heat, add the oil and carefully lay the wedges of Romanesco into the oiled pan, turning over to coat both cut sides. Immediately sprinkle over a little of the spice-salt mixture, turning when the underside is golden. Sprinkle over a little more of the spice-salt. Set aside as you toast your bread.
  5. Lightly oil the bread and either grill or griddle it, until toasted.
  6. To assemble, spread the soya bean mixture over the toasted baguette, top with the chutney, then the cauliflower. Garnish with a few sprigs of chervil, a few blueberries and soya beans.
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  • Holy crapola. Is this a shoot you did for Gourmet Traveller? I am in awe of your photos. I really am.

    These are just about the fanciest crostini I’ve ever seen. You SHOULD submit them to Gourmet Traveller. N x

  • I could eat the page

  • She Needs Romanesco. Seriously.

  • These photos are gorgeous, I cannot get over them. and that romesco cauliflower? AND beet and blueberry chutney?! So good, prettiest crostini I have ever seen!

  • Sara (Belly Rumbles)

    How smexy are these John.

  • What a really unusual combination, John! You have such a great sense of combining flavors I would never htink to match. Truly gorgeous, too.

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