Sangria tart

Sangria tart

Sangria tart

Hands up from those that can’t help ordering a jug of sangria when dining at Spanish restaurants. It kind of happens by default, doesn’t it? For some of us, anyway. And the scary thing is that the jug’s empty before any tapas come out. Well then allow me to introduce you to my sangria tart!

Sangria tart

It tastes like sangria, has some of the same ingredients, but you won’t get pissed because the alcohol has cooked out of the syrup.

Did you all just lose interest?

Oh, hold on, there’s still booze in the apples – so I told a little lie.

Interested again?

Sangria tart

Ok, so let’s start with the fruit. Sangria always has apple and orange in it, so those two can be found in this little baby. Actually, the apple is the hero and the orange only shows its zesty face. Chunks of juicy orange would take the tart into soppy territory, so food science prevented me from going there. I’m not into sloppy tarts, and I’m assuming you have an aversion, as well.

Sangria tart

Just like traditional Spanish sangria, the bulk of the liquid is red vino. Forget the expensive stuff, and same goes for the cardboard box variety. Nothing too dry, nothing too sweet. You want something juuust right. No white spirits here, either. Or fizzy lemonade.

Slice up your apple, toss in some orange and lemon zest (the lemon zest is in place of the lemonade – food science, remember) a bit of cinnamon spice and fragrant vanilla.

A good soak overnight with the red wine, some sugar and orange juice and it’s good to go the following day. Yep, this isn’t one to knock together at the last minute. Forward planning is paramount.

Sangria tart

Sangria may be Spanish, but I’ve taken the concept of France’s tarte fine to create this dessert. Puff pastry topped with thinly sliced apple, baked and then caramelised beneath a grill.

Sangria tart translation – a thin, crispy and flaky pastry base topped with thinly sliced apple soaked with booze, spices and zest.

And we can’t go wasting that liquor the apple was soaking in, right? That’s reduced down to a syrup so you can drizzle as much, or as little, as your heart desires.

Sangria tart

 

Print Recipe
Sangria tart
Fruit, red wine and a little bit of spice. Sangria tart - your favourite Spanish cocktail in dessert form!
Sangria tart
Course Dessert
Cuisine Spanish
Servings
servings
Ingredients
Course Dessert
Cuisine Spanish
Servings
servings
Ingredients
Sangria tart
Instructions
  1. Dissolve the 1 cup of caster sugar in the red wine. Set aside.
  2. Cut the top and bottom off the apples, then thinly slice with a mandolin or very sharp knife. Peel and core the apple beforehand, if you wish, but I don't think it's necessary. Just pop the seeds out once it's sliced. Put the apple into a large bowl.
  3. Using a peeler, slice off 2 - 3 pieces of the lemon rind and toss them in with the apples. Reserve the rest of the lemon for another recipe.
  4. Do the same with the orange, except you want to juice it and pour the juice in with the apples.
  5. Cut the vanilla pod lengthways and scrape the seeds out. Toss the seeds in with the 3 tablespoons of caster sugar, rub them into the sugar and set aside.
  6. Put the scraped vanilla pod in with the apples, add the cinnamon stick and then pour over the red wine. Mix it a little with your hand, then lay a side plate on top to keep the apples submerged.
  7. Refrigerate overnight.
  8. Using a fine mesh sieve, drain the wine from the fruit and spices straight into a small saucepan. Put the cinnamon stick and vanilla pod in with the wine. Lay the slices of apple onto lots of kitchen paper and dry them really well on both sides. Reserve the lemon and orange rinds.
  9. While the tart is baking you can make the sangria syrup.
  10. Preheat the oven to 180°C.
  11. Line a baking tray with baking paper, then brush it with some of the melted butter. Sprinkle over about half of the vanilla sugar.
  12. Take your sheet of defrosted puff pastry and cut a 24 centimetre diameter circle from it. Use a dinner plate, or anything the same size as the pastry. Lay the circle of pastry on top of the prepared baking sheet, then arrange the dried apple slices over it, leaving a 1 centimetre border. Brush the apples and pastry border with more butter and bake for 30 minutes.
  13. Take the tart out of the oven and switch the oven to grill mode.
  14. Scatter the remaining vanilla sugar over the tart and put it under the grill until slightly browned. Keep an eye on it as it can burn very quickly.
Syrup
  1. Bring the wine, cinnamon and vanilla pot to the boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer, allowing it to cook for about 15 minutes. Remove the cinnamon and vanilla pod - discarding the cinnamon but reserving the vanilla pod. Continue simmering for another 10 minutes or so, until it has reduced and coats the back of a spoon. Set aside to cool.
  2. To serve, drizzle the syrup over the tart and garnish with the reserved vanilla pod and the finely julienned reserved lemon and orange rind.
Recipe Notes

If the pastry grills faster than the apples, tear off a piece of foil big enough to cover the tart. Cut a circle the same diameter as the apples on top of the tart, lay the foil over the tart to cover the pastry (only exposing the apples) and continue grilling until the apples get some colour.

Share this Recipe
  • What a great idea John. Could I eat a piece with my Sangria?

  • This is absolutely beautiful! I too can’t resist a jug (or two…) of sangria so this is right up my street 😉

  • Well, I’m not going to give up on a sloppy tart next time I’m pissed, but the rest of the time, I’m going to be all about this beauty.

  • Sangria tart is genius! Those boozy fruit pieces are always the best bit!

  • You had me at sangria! Love the stuff and am the only piggy one who eats all the boozy fruit when the pitcher is empty. This is a great way to do a tart – simple and elegant. And I suppose you can serve it with more sangria, right?

    • That boozy fruit in the bottom of the empty pitcher is like icing on the cake!

  • KevinIsCooking

    While I don’t drink, this one is a beauty. Glad you kept the messy bits out and packed this with maximum flava! I’d eat me a slice or three.

  • AmandaChewTown

    My goodness, this is Sangria perfection John!

    • Maybe you could have this tart with a jug of sangria as well, yes?

      • AmandaChewTown

        Si!!

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