Stonska torta

Stonska torta

Stonska torta - International bakeware cake tin

Most of us have heard of Dubrovnik, that stunning walled city on the southern Croatian coastline, but has anyone heard of Ston? I know I didn’t, until recently.

This small town, along with its mini-me offshoot of Mali Ston are barely an hours drive from Dubrovnik. They’re known for a few things – the fortified medieval wall that surrounds the old town centres, the mussel and oyster farms in the gulf and the salt that has been produced there since Roman times. Salt that so happens to be the purest in the Mediterranean – or so they say.

The defensive walls were built to protect the salt pans; a resource that contributed to Dubrovnik’s wealth. I do love a bit of trivia now and again.

Stonska torta recipe

Another gastronomic delight that comes out of Ston is the Stonska torta; a cake that has sweet and savoury elements that you either like or are challenged to get your palate around.

A thin, unsweetened pastry envelops a tangle of long macaroni, firmly compressed and mixed with nuts, lemon zest, sugar, chocolate and butter – all bound with beaten egg.

Once it’s on the serving plate it gets doused very liberally with sugar – some even go as far as garnishing it with berries and sugar-coated almonds.

Something that wouldn’t go amiss here is poppy seeds. I reckon they’d bring a nice bit of crunch to the otherwise soft and mildly flavoured innards.

*Non-stick Cake Pan and Cooling Rack supplied by International Bakeware

Stonska torta recept

Stonska torta international bakeware cooling rack

 

Print Recipe
Stonska torta
Unique to the village of Ston, Croatia, this Stonska Torta could be the most unusual cake you'll ever see.
Stonska torta recept
Course Dessert
Cuisine Croatian
Servings
servings
Ingredients
Pastry
Filling
Course Dessert
Cuisine Croatian
Servings
servings
Ingredients
Pastry
Filling
Stonska torta recept
Instructions
  1. Bring a large pot of water to the boil. Cook the pasta for 7-8 minutes, or according to packet directions. Drain very well. Pour the lemon juice (reserve the zest), oil and rum over the warm pasta and mix it through. Set aside.
  2. Mix the ground walnuts, almonds, chocolate, sugar and cinnamon together. Set aside.
  3. Beat the eggs and vanilla together until a little foamy. Set aside.
  4. Preheat the oven to 180°C. Grease a 25cm x 10cm springform cake tin and dust with flour.
  5. Roll the pastry into a circle big enough to fit into the base of the prepared tin, up the sides and enough overhang to go down the sides. Carefully lift the rolled pastry into the prepared tin. Sprinkle the nut filling into the base of the pastry-lined tin. Place a single layer of cooked pasta over the top, then sprinkle over more of the nut mixture. Dot with slices of butter. Be generous with the nut mixture as you use it.
  6. Repeat this process with the remaining pasta, nut mixture and butter, gently pressing down as you go. When you get to the top, evenly pour the beaten eggs over the filling. Gather the overhanging pastry over the filling, trimming off any excess. Press the pastry down and try to press out any air pockets you may hear squishing in there.
  7. Rub a little butter over the pastry, place the tin into the oven and bake for 1 hr 15 minutes, or until golden.
  8. Allow to cool in the tin before taking it out.
  9. To serve, turn the cake upside down, generously sprinkle with caster sugar or icing sugar - plus some berries and nuts, if you wish.
Share this Recipe
  • Wow- this is fascinating- I’ve never seen anything quite like it!

  • Wow, really interesting, I have never seen anything like it. I would love to try it 🙂

  • Jessie Oleson Moore

    What? Never seen anything like it. It looks awesome!

  • Sara (Belly Rumbles)

    Now I know what became of the pasta you were searching for. I knew it would end up as something pretty sensational! This dish appeals to my Baltic heritage very nicely.

  • The outside pastry looks amazing John, smooth as silk. It does look very beautiful, I am not sure I would like to eat it, though I could look at it’s holiness all day

  • How pretty is this! It’s like a carb-lover’s dream come true. Nice action shot with the icing sugar snowstorm too!

  • Did you seriously haul all of that upstairs to do those shots? This is an incredible set and knowing where / how you shoot, am in awe! Love the carb on carb 🙂 This is so beautiful!

  • This is such a stunning and unusual confection. I have to try making it!

  • This is a fascinating recipe, John, and reminds me so much of some of the sweet (main course) pastas served in Bologna, Italy, during the Renaissance: pasta made with rose water, then served topped with sugar, cinnamon, cloves, butter and more rose water. Thanks for another Croatian treat! Fab photos, as always – love the sugar raining down on the berries!

    • Thanks, David. I’ve read about those sweet pasta dishes that were served in Italy back then. Would love to try it sometime!

      • We’ve tried a few from Lynn Kasper Rosetti’s “The Splendid Table” and have loved them. Maybe we’ll make you one when you visit!

  • I’m on board with everyone else: this is stunning and unusual. My question is, do you serve this as dessert?

    • Thanks Jeff, something tells me this may not be served as dessert after a savoury meal. Instead I’m thinking it’s something you’d have if you were going into, say, a cafe somewhere and sitting down to a coffee or small glass of sweet wine with a slice of this torta. I could be wrong, however. It’s a bit on the heavy side.

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